Scientists Create Gel That Prolongs The Youth Of Human Skin

“Starting in 2009, to achieve more rapid effects in the therapy at the cellular level, we began to use active components that are extracted from the cultured cells and to apply them directly in the area to obtain a greater effect”, explains Evgueni Shuman, director of the innovation center of the Ural State University of Medicine, where they have developed a product called Aversgel, a cosmetological gel with rejuvenating properties.

This technology consists in taking the patient’s blood, from which, after a detailed centrifugation process, the plasma containing the stem cells is separated, with the highest safety in terms of the health of the components.

According to María Desiátova, a specialist in cellular and molecular technologies of the genetic block, the methodology consists of extracting DNA from cell cultures, provoking polymerase chain reactions and identifying the different mutations that may arise in the genes of these cells.With the revolutionary of these technologies, a future can also be applied to the teeth, obviously with the supervision of a dentist in Tijuana. Imagine your teeth as young and bright as those you had in youth

“It is a stage of control during the development of the Aversgel, where we take those cells that are used in this product and we evaluate their safety”, specifies Desiátova.

Positive results

During 2 years of clinical trials, which are now in the final stage, a large group of patients participated in the process and in this way it was demonstrated that the gel has the properties to restore the damages attributed to the daily exposure to the environment.

“Clinical trials of the formula made in gel began in 2015 and in more than 100 participants gave positive results,” says Shuman.

Active longevity

The center’s researchers plan to begin small-scale gel production, this product will be used in cosmetology and it has also been proven in the experimental phase that it will help many patients with burns, ulcers and damage caused by low temperatures in the Russian winter.

The task of the Innovation Center of the Ural State Medical University also seeks to support young specialists in the development of new research that will help patients with chronic diseases in the future.

“The main interest is the extension of active longevity, which is what most human beings aspire to achieve,” says Oleg Makéyev, head of the university’s cell and gene therapy laboratory.